Bourdain Market Slowly Continues to Develop

After a brief hiatus of travel through Central Europe for work and pleasure (a few upcoming blog posts will cover this), I am back with regular blog updates 3 to 4 times a week.

Vogue magazine recently published an interview with Anthony Bourdain.  A good part of the article is based around his upbringing and success with his television show.  What it also revealed are details on the much-hyped Anthony Bourdain Food Hall which seems to be called “Bourdain Market”.

Pier 57 is a hulking postwar structure that juts into the Hudson River at the end of West Fifteenth Street. Built in 1952, it was one of the largest and busiest piers on New York’s waterfront, but the building became obsolete in the seventies, when the shipping industry started to use cargo containers. It was a bus depot for a while, and then a temporary detention center during the 2004 Republican National Convention. Now empty, the 480,000-square-foot structure is being readied for renovation and eventual occupation by two major tenants. Google has signed on to take over a large section, and 155,000 square feet is due to become a vast food hall called Bourdain Market.

155,000 square feet is enormous for a food hall.  Most modern food halls in the United States are in the range of 10,000 to 40,000 square feet.  Even if one-third of the space is used for common areas, seating, hallways, and back of house, that is still over 100,000 square feet of space for tenants.  This means there could be upwards of 100 to 150 merchants in the food hall at full fit-out.  Amazing, but also a very daunting task.  There are only so many noodle stands, fusion tacos, or fresh ground burgers before it can become repetitive.  But if anyone can convince tenants to move into the space, it is Bourdain.

Bourdain Market is expected to be open in 2019, and I suppose the countdown clock is on.

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